Life

Life

Audiobook CD - 2010
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s
SFBookAddict
Dec 28, 2018

This book has been on my books to read list for years so I finally got around to reading it. What kept me from reading it sooner was my reluctance to read the details of Keith's drug use. I just wasn't ready to go there when this book first came out.

As a kid, I was into the Beatles more than the Stones in the 1960s so I learned a lot of new things about the Stones from this book --- the early days of the Stones, why they formed the group, and the group's vision and goal. Keith is very straightforward and honest which I really liked. And he sure has some very interesting tales to tell, some hair raising. He clears up a lot of rumors, which I appreciate. His friendship with Mick Jagger was also revealing. I also enjoyed reading about Keith's strong connection to music --- how that started and endured all these years. He really is devoted to music. I loved reading about him collaborating with other musicians. As expected, his accounts about all the hard drugs was depressing. It always amazes me that Keith survived all that heavy drug use and has lived to a ripe old age. This book showed me that it's his love of music that has kept him alive all these years. Music is the medicine that counteracted all the bad stuff he put in his body.

This isn't the best written rock star bio, and I swear Keith repeated himself at times. Sometimes I couldn't follow what he was saying as it just wasn't clear. Yet I'm glad I read his bio, even though it is very long and meanders here and there. The book is free flowing, very much like the man himself. Keith has had one hell of a life. I'm glad he wrote the book. It's his perspective, his life. It's a must read for all Stones and rock fans.

not sure I learned anything of value from this one; it is different from other books of this sort. curiously uninvolving, however. and l-o-o-o-n-g.

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mrsid
Jul 05, 2016

Having lived in the same part of Dartford and walked the cinder track many,many times,I can vouch for the veracity of the first part of the book-it really was just like that,even 20 years later.....some places don't change much at all.Shame I don't rate this playing much or enjoy the Stones a bit more,but it's still an entertaining read if you like that sort of thing. His takes on pot and friendship are interesting-kerf's not a thickie after all !

Give it a whirl.

b
bluesky60
May 13, 2016

I could not help comparing Keith Richards timeline to my own: he was in South of France, Switzerland, New York, West Indies and all the while I was steadily working my job. He did vast quantities of drugs, gallons of alchol, days witout sleep. The book gives a real insight into the life of a rock star. You can go anywhere, do anything and get away with it. Money is no object. He has a writer working with him but it seems an authentic Keith Richard voice. Liked the book. Full of information and interest. Not a quick read too much content and that's a good thing.

This book is a fascinating insight into one of the greatest guitar players of our time. I found his stories of how the Stones got together, the making of "Exile on Main Street", and his relationship with Mick over the years to be very interesting. Recommended by James

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Wong_Anne
Jun 09, 2015

Keith Richard's autobiography read like a story and left me wondering how the man survived. He does not back away from the many poor decisions that he made. It seems like an honest account of the Stone's back story - - but then I wasn't there. Never-the-less - an interesting glimpse of the rock-and-roll lifestyle.

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Liblo
Apr 29, 2015

I had to check this out multiple times to finish it, but when it was finally over I hated to say good-bye. Keith is a very, very fun, amiable, intelligent and interesting companion. I enjoyed every second of this book. Very well worth the read.

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booksgm
Apr 09, 2015

Boring .boring ,boring .I find it hard to believe it won the Norman Mailer prize ,what a shame when there are so many good books out there .

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looper46
Sep 10, 2014

Keith(or Keef) as his pals call him, has been one of my rock heroes forever. Always liked the Beatles, but the Stones were the band for me. He has always been an honest dude, never sugar coating his drug use and his life as a legend that will endure forever.

His book is honest, informative and a fun read. Really enjoyed how he got his sound and his interaction with the other Stones. People will be listening to the Stones and Beatles in 2214 and appreciating the bands.

p
pattyskypants
Dec 25, 2013

I love the way he talks . . . like a movie script or a story board . . . and his writing is the same and for that I am Happy! If it doesn't make sense to you, it's because how could it? He has lived in a world that is completely alien to almost all of us, sheltered from the business end of his art. He is a perpetual teenager, able to explore all his creative whims with no constraints. I found his explanations of his drug use and his composing and song-writing very rational and informative. I don't sense any darkness or deceit about him at all. Never have. He is not a poseur; he is an authentic, an original.

willy56 Aug 21, 2013

Well done bio by a guy who be most standards shouldn't be alive with the amount of dangerous drugs he has consumed.
A life in the longest working rock band on earth has to take it's toll and Richards tells it all.
From his earliest days to meeting Jagger to right now.
He talks about how he made certain sounds for songs and you need to be a guitar player to understand what he means but nice to see him giving away his secrets.

patmike41 Jun 14, 2013

I listened to this book on CD. Had I not been driving, I would have returned the book after the first few discs. The narrators are simply awful. The book itself tells the story of an egotistical, self-perceived tough, overindulgent drug addict who got lucky because he could play a guitar and compose popular songs, which is part of what I knew before beginning the read. What is disappointing is that, after you have finished the book, you didn't learn much more about the Keith Richards, the Stones, or the music than you knew before starting the book . How unfortunate considering their longevity and their impact on rock and roll. My recommendation -- don't waste your time.

k
kay_g_93
May 28, 2013

Excellent read! I enjoyed the entire bio cover from cover and have very limited knowledge of music (and admittedly the Stones) so if you are a fan of the above you'll take twice as much away. An exceptionally honest recount with humour and pain along the way and plenty of insight into the trials and tribulations of one of the greatest rock and roll bands. Keith Richards ends up between a rock and a hard place endless times, but it all makes for great adventure and even better triumph when he escapes and keeps roll'in on.

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milesthecat
Apr 11, 2013

This was quite an enjoyable bio (autobio) of a remarkable man who I think is lucky (over and over again) to be around to share his life with us. He is very open about the abuses he put himself under and the joys and difficulties partnering with one of the most famous figures in pop/rock culture history. I finished the book with (even) more admiration for the man and the artist than before. I have been a stones fan for their 50+ years which may have influence this review somewhat.

s
Smithca73
Apr 09, 2013

Not a big Stones fan, but i found bits of this intriguing. Interesting insight into the music scene in the 70's/80's. Definitely dragged in parts, particularly as keiths life became more tame in his later years.

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nannerl
Dec 05, 2012

Whether you enjoy this book or not will depend on what you hope to find in it. Personally, I just wanted to know something about Keith Richards, what kind of guy he is. I'm a fan of Stones music, but don't follow celebrity news, so all I remembered about him was the Canadian drug bust decades ago. Some things surprised me - that he's been married 30 years and doesn't sleep around, that he stopped doing drugs decades ago, that he has a bad temper, that he drinks almost constantly. He sounds like a strange mixture of needy and arrogant, as he says his 'mates' and the Stones are his top priorities. The thing is, he seems to have a lot of mates, but really I think it's just a bunch of name-dropping and back-slapping. Doesn't say anything negative about anyone without balancing it by saying he loves them, including Mick. Mick comes off as a jerk. Not the kind of thing I usually read, but it was mildly entertaining, and had some funny stories about his youth.

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MikeEe
Nov 19, 2012

Fascinating look at his life, even if Keith has an ego that won't quit.

DBStewart Oct 22, 2012

Turns out Keith is a pirate afterall.

That said... for someone that's led a life of such high drama this book is a bit of a slow read. The most interesting sections deal with the music, a very few sparkling insights unfortunately. Also an interesting story about Charlie Watts and Mick. Turns out Charlie is a pirate, too.

rocknrollphilip Aug 13, 2012

Given that the co-author is, arguably, rocknroll's most famous guitarist from, arguably, rocknroll's most famous band, this book is astonishingly bad. When attempting to find ANYTHING about Between The Buttons, I must skim through page after page after page after page after page after page after page of trivia concerning some girlfriend, followed by page after page after page after page of trivia concerning some girlfriend's drug use, followed by page after page after page after page of trivia concerning the effect that said drug use had on said girlfriend's life. I don't care! Only a middle-aged house wife will find this tome interesting.

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uncommonreader
Aug 02, 2012

This autobiography is a straightforward chronology by Richards who shows obvious respect for his family and friends. Surprisingly, it was not that insightful about music.

c
carolannbagan
Jul 04, 2012

funny book about the best rock guitar player aside from jimmy page. very cool. still floors me that he lived through all the stuff he put his body though.

BPLNextBestAdults Jun 05, 2012

Surprising things you didn’t know about Keith Richards: he was an only child, loved being a boy scout, enjoys reading, and now lives in Connecticut with his wife of 29 years, Patti Hansen. Even more surprising, this book won the Norman Mailer Prize for distinguished biography.
Appeal Factor: Told in a chatty style, guitarist, Keith tells all, well, nearly all, in this detailed biography about his years with the Rolling Stones. Richards exhibits an impressive memory even while admitting to a past of “checking out” due to excessive partying and drug abuse.

d
DirtyHarry55
Apr 17, 2012

Book is rather slow and not what I expected. I thought it would focus more on the exploits of the band (you know... sex, drugs and rock and roll). There is an awful lot of technical talk on how he plays different songs. I am into music, but do not play the guitar so I was lost during these references. It was OK. If you are a Stones or Richards fan, read it.

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mountainmadness
Feb 26, 2012

If you have ever been a Stones fan you will enjoy the epic tales of survival and triumph. Keef is a pirate, an outlaw, an anti hero and an endearing and enduring figure. Finishing the book was sad because the crazy tales were coming to an end, it was like saying goodbye to a legendary friend.
This book will urge you to break out the old albums and start your on Stones Revival. Thanks Keef!

dotdeangelo Feb 06, 2012

Who else could glamorize death?


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