Good Morning, Mr. Mandela

Good Morning, Mr. Mandela

Book - 2014
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A white Afrikaner, Zelda la Grange grew up in segregated South Africa, supporting the regime and the rules of apartheid. Her conservative family referred to the imprisoned Nelson Mandela as a terrorist. Yet just a few years after his release and the end of apartheid, she would be traveling the world by Mr. Mandelas side, having grown to respect and cherish the man she would come to call "Khulu," or grandfather."
Good Morning, Mr. Mandela tells the extraordinary story of how a young womans life, beliefs, prejudiceseverything she once believedwere utterly transformed by the man she had been taught was the enemy. It is the incredible journey of an awkward, terrified young secretary in her twenties who rose from a job in a government typing pool to become one of the presidents most loyal and devoted associates. During his presidency she was one of his three private secretaries, and then became an aide-de-camp and spokesperson and managed his office in his retirement. Working and traveling by his side for almost two decades, La Grange found herself negotiating with celebrities and world leaders, all in the cause of supporting and caring for Mr. Mandela in his many roles.
Here La Grange pays tribute to Nelson Mandela as she knew hima teacher who gave her the most valuable lessons of her life. The Mr. Mandela we meet in these pages is a man who refused to be defined by his past, who forgave and respected all, but who was also frank, teasing, and direct. As he renewed his country, he also freed La Grange from a closed world of fear and mistrust, giving her life true meaning. I was fearful of so much twenty years agoof life, of black people, of this black man and the future of South Africaand I now was no longer persuaded or influenced by mainstream fears. He not only liberated the black man but the white man, too..
Publisher: New York, New York : Viking, [2014]
Copyright Date: ©2014
ISBN: 9780525428282
0525428283
Branch Call Number: 968.064 MANDE LAGRA
Characteristics: xiv, 368 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations (some color), map ; 24 cm

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List - New Memoirs
GreenwichFiction Jun 24, 2014

Here La Grange pays tribute to Nelson Mandela as she knew him a teacher who gave her the most valuable lessons of her life. The Mr. Mandela we meet in these pages is a man who refused to be defined by his past, who forgave and respected all, but who was also frank, teasing, and direct. As he rene... Read More »


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Liber_vermis
Nov 15, 2016

After reading Nelson Mandela's biography, "Long Walk to Freedom", many years ago, I was interested to get a very different perspective on this world famous national leader. I was not disappointed although the author warned, in the introduction, that it was not a "tell all" memoir of "Madiba". The author was too repetitiously self-deprecating which added many pages to the text. A basic map of South Africa shows the places named in this memoir; but it lacks an index that would have been helpful to keep track of persons named. For the first three-quarters of this memoir, the author refers to Nelson Mandela's wife as "Mrs. Machel" rather than "Graça" which suggests a lack of affection between these women (see p. 264). It is a tell-all account of the Mandela-family's machinations following the patriarch's death.

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mibrooks
Mar 21, 2015

Isabel
It gave me the reader an intimate side of the life of Mandela while in office and made me admire him all the more. I enjoyed the book very much

r
Rosina
Dec 27, 2014

This was not a well written book. however, it was absolutely fascinating. It is the kind of book full of Matibaisms, lines you want to remember for ever. The book held my attention, I had to read on...it was incredibly sad but i want a followup.....

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Liber_vermis
Nov 12, 2016

"[In late 2000 Australian Prime Minister Howard and Nelson Mandela] debated the Aborigines' issues and Madiba was under pressure to speak out against the [Australian] government for the treatment of the Aborigines. Madiba maintained what he had said for a long time - that he would listen to the grievances of people but that he would not interfere in the domestic affairs of another country." (p. 164)

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