The Culture of Contentment

The Culture of Contentment

Book - 1992
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Houghton
This book traces the course of America's current sense of contentment, stemming from the economic comfort achieved by the fortunate, politically dominant community during the Reagan-Bush era of the 1980s. Galbraith focuses on the results of this stasis, including short-term thinking and investment, government as a burden, and corporate sclerosis. The author also explores international issues, such as the parallels between the denial of trouble in Eastern Europe and problems unrecognized in America. This book is a groundbreaking assessment of the future of America.

Baker & Taylor
A response to the current state of American affairs traces the course of the self-serving economic comfort achieved by the fortunate, politically dominant community during the Reagan-Bush era of the 1980s. By the author of The Affluent Society and The New Industrial State. Tour.

Book News
A concise, contumacious critique of the complacent class that rules America in the interest of its own comfort, by distinguished economist Galbraith (emeritus, Harvard U.). Annotation copyright Book News, Inc. Portland, Or.

Blackwell North Amer
The Culture of Contentment is a keen and striking appraisal of America's current, far from happy state of affairs, written by possibly our wisest and certainly our most lucid and irreverent economist, John Kenneth Galbraith. This major new work goes far beyond Ronald Reagan and George Bush to ultimate and controlling causes--to the rise of a greatly self-satisfied elite that is now dominant in the electoral process. The result: today, a once strong and aspiring nation has lapsed into a self-serving economic and social stasis. Surveying this development with a detached and penetrating eye, Galbraith lives up to his reputation as "the voice and conscience of the economic profession."
Galbraith here scrutinizes the perilous by-products of complacency: a commitment to short-term action and inaction, restricted investment as a basic policy, government seen only as a burden, corporate sclerosis, and the dark side of financial speculation. He also considers the fate of the "functional underclass," people who are stalled in poverty and denied the crucial support needed to change their situation.
The larcenous savings-and-loan and junk-bond scandals are examined as major examples of the controlling principles of contentment. And from the clear-eyed global perspective for which he is celebrated, Galbraith regards key issues on the world scene: the emergence of the powerful new economies of Japan and Germany, the larger, often recreational nature of foreign policy, and self-controlling, self-enhancing military power. Making no concession to false optimism, Galbraith leaves no one in doubt as to what could be done, little as we may be disposed to do it.
Here, in short, is an acute and powerful assessment of where we are heading and not heading and what the consequences will be, from one of the sharpest and most original minds of our time.

Baker
& Taylor

Traces the course of the economic comfort achieved by the politically dominant community during the Reagan-Bush era of the 1980s

Publisher: Boston : Houghton Mifflin, 1992
ISBN: 9780395572283
0395572282
Branch Call Number: 306.3097 GALBR
Characteristics: ix, 195 pages ; 22 cm
Notes: Includes index

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mariednguyen
Sep 27, 2013

This book traces the course of America's current sense of contentment, stemming from the economic comfort achieved by the fortunate, politically dominant community during the Reagan-Bush era of the 1980s. Galbraith focuses on the results of this stasis, including short-term thinking and investment, government as a burden, and corporate sclerosis. The author also explores international issues, such as the parallels between the denial of trouble in Eastern Europe and problems unrecognized in America. This book is a groundbreaking assessment of the future of America.

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