Travels With My Aunt

Travels With My Aunt

Book - 1971
Average Rating:
5
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Baker & Taylor
Henry Pulling, a retired manager, volunteers to accompany his aunt on a trip to Istanbul and soon becomes involved with an ill-assorted group of travelers on the Orient Express

Publisher: London : Penguin Books in association with the Bodley Head, 1971
ISBN: 9780140185010
0140185011
Branch Call Number: FICTION GREEN...G
Characteristics: 264 pages ; 20 cm
Notes: Originally published: Bodley Head, 1969

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lukasevansherman
Apr 19, 2014

British author Graham Greene was incredibly prolific, writing novels, short stories, plays and film reviews over the course of his long, distinguished career. He often split his books up into "entertainments" (his espionage tales) and more serious works, like "The Power and the Glory." But his best books are both entertaining and serious and this is a good example. The irrepressible Aunt Augusta is one of his greatest creations and she's such a good character that there's a noticeable lack of energy when she's offstage. I agree that the ending wraps up too neatly, but it's the travels that matter.

d
donnamo
Dec 08, 2013

A surprising tale, not what I was expecting. Story of how the people we encounter can change our lives if we allow them to.

g
GuyN
Sep 22, 2012

It is hard for me to describe this book because it doesn't fit into any genre. A reclusive middle aged bank manager set free by his bank joins his libertine aunt and is bit by bit drawn into a world of political intrigue, international smuggling, and recreational drug use. Feasting on dry British humour and elegant prose the reader enjoys understanding more of what is going on than our hero but a good deal less than his aunt. Locales range from Paris to Uruguay.

s
straitgate
Jun 26, 2012

a lot of people don't really care for this work of Greene but it's one of my favorites. It's a joy to accompany the eccentric Aunt Augusta and to vicariously experience Henry's slow awakening. I especially liked Augusta's metaphor of "the wall" that is closing in. Very Auntie Mame.

a
AJ_in_CoMo
Mar 21, 2011

The story was intriguing and unpredictable, but I didn't care for the ending, which seemed to suddenly tie everything up neatly. It was too convenient and didn't follow the mood of the rest of the book. Overall, though, it was enjoyable to read.

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