Walter Benjamin at the Dairy Queen

Walter Benjamin at the Dairy Queen

Reflections at Sixty and Beyond

Book - 1999
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Baker & Taylor
The Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Lonesome Dove presents a revealing memoir of his personal odyssey from rancher's son to critically acclaimed novelist, in an intriguing reminiscence set against the vast and colorful backdrop of the Lone Star State, past and present. 175,000 first printing.

Book News
McMurtry (Pulitzer prize-winning author of Lonesome Dove ) read Walter Benjamin's essay about the death of the oral tradition in a Texas Dairy Queen 20 years prior to writing this book. Benjamin's essay serves as a springboard for McMurtry's examination of the lost art of storytelling, the meaning of reading, the death of the cowboy, and the significance of Texas' vast frontier. These are recollections of a cowboy childhood and McMurtry's eventual escape from the life of men and horses and into the culture of books. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Blackwell North Amer
In a work of nonfiction - as close to an autobiography as his readers are likely to get - Larry McMurtry has written a family portrait that also serves as a larger portrait of Texas itself, as it was, and as it has become.
Using as a springboard an essay by the German literary critic Walter Benjamin that he first read in Archer City's Dairy Queen, McMurtry examines the small-town way of life that big oil and big ranching have nearly destroyed. He praises the virtues of everything from a lime Dr Pepper and the lost art of oral storytelling to the perfect piece of pie, and describes the brutal effect of the sheer vastness and emptiness of the Texas landscape on Texans, the decline of the cowboy, the significance of small-town rodeos (and rodeo queens), the reality and the myth of the frontier.
McMurtry writes frankly and with deep feeling about his own experiences as a writer, a parent, a heart patient, and he deftly lays bare the raw material that helped shape his life's work: the creation of a vast, ambitious, fictional panorama of Texas in the past and the present.

Baker
& Taylor

The Pulitzer Prize-winning author presents a memoir of his odyssey from rancher's son to critically acclaimed novelist, in a reminiscence set against the backdrop of the Lone Star State

Simon and Schuster
In a lucid, brilliant work of nonfiction -- as close to an autobiography as his readers are likely to get -- Larry McMurtry has written a family portrait that also serves as a larger portrait of Texas itself, as it was, and as it has become. Using as a springboard an essay by the German literary critic Walter Benjamin that he first read in Archer City's Dairy Queen, McMurtry examines the small-town way of life that big oil and big ranching have nearly destroyed. He praises the virtues of everything from a lime Dr Pepper and the lost art of oral storytelling to the perfect piece of pie, and describes the brutal effect of the sheer vastness and emptiness of the Texas landscape on Texans, the decline of the cowboy, the significance of small-town rodeos (and rodeo queens), the reality and the myth of the frontier. McMurtry writes frankly and with deep feeling about his own experiences as a writer, a parent, a heart patient, and he deftly lays bare the raw material that helped shape his life's work: the creation of a vast, ambitious, fictional panorama of Texas in the past and the present. And throughout, McMurtry leaves his readers with constant reminders of his all-encompassing boundless love of literature and books -- for nobody has captured better the romance of the book trade, in which McMurtry has famously found an equally ambitious second career, gradually transforming his native Archer City into a town of books, like Britain's Hay-on-Wye. Full of anecdotes, pithy humor, historical insights, and wry nostalgia, this elegiac and strangely touching cominc work is at once a literary and autobiographical tour de force about growing up, growing famous, and growing older.

Publisher: New York : Simon & Schuster, [1999]
Copyright Date: ©1999
ISBN: 9780684854960
0684854961
Branch Call Number: 813x MCMUR MCMUR
Characteristics: 204 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm

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johncruse
May 20, 2017

DISHONEST TITLE. HAS LITTLE IF ANY CONTENT REGARDING WALTER OR THE DAIRY QUEEN. IT IS SIMPLY A RAMBLE ABOUT THE AUTHOR HIMSELF. BORING.

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