American Son

American Son

A Portrait of John F. Kennedy, Jr

Book - 2002
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Baker & Taylor
An editor at "George" magazine explores Kennedy's last, defining years, revealing how he dealt with the challenges of running a successful business, managed the pressures of a high public profile, and adjusted to marriage.

McMillan Palgrave
The last, defining years of the life of John F. Kennedy, Jr., as seen by an editor who worked for him at George magazine.

At thirty-four, better known for his social life than his work as an assistant district attorney, John F. Kennedy, Jr., was still a man in search of his destiny. All that changed in 1995, when Kennedy launched a bold new magazine about American politics, puckishly called George. Over the next four years, Kennedy's passionate commitment to the magazine -- and to the ideals it stood for -- transformed him.

One witness to this transformation was Richard Blow, an editor and writer who joined George several months before the release of its first issue. During their four years together, Blow observed his boss rise to enormous challenges -- starting a risky new business, managing the pressures that attend a high public profile, and beginning life as a married man. With Blow as our surrogate, we see the many sides of Kennedy's personality: the rebel who fearlessly takes on politicians and pundits; the gentleman who sends gracious thank-you notes to his colleagues for their wedding gifts; the vulnerable son occasionally at odds with a mythic family legacy; the leader who stays true to his vision, no matter how difficult the circumstances.

Simply and sympathetically, Blow offers an affecting portrait of a complicated man at last coming into his own -- sometimes gracefully, sometimes under siege, but never without the burden of great expectations.


Holtzbrinck
The last, defining years of the life of John F. Kennedy, Jr., as seen by an editor who worked for him at George magazine. At thirty-four, better known for his social life than his work as an assistant district attorney, John F. Kennedy, Jr., was still a man in search of his destiny. All that changed in 1995, when Kennedy launched a bold new magazine about American politics, puckishly called George . Over the next four years, Kennedy's passionate commitment to the magazine -- and to the ideals it stood for -- transformed him. One witness to this transformation was Richard Blow, an editor and writer who joined George several months before the release of its first issue. During their four years together, Blow observed his boss rise to enormous challenges -- starting a risky new business, managing the pressures that attend a high public profile, and beginning life as a married man. With Blow as our surrogate, we see the many sides of Kennedy's personality: the rebel who fearlessly takes on politicians and pundits; the gentleman who sends gracious thank-you notes to his colleagues for their wedding gifts; the vulnerable son occasionally at odds with a mythic family legacy; the leader who stays true to his vision, no matter how difficult the circumstances. Simply and sympathetically, Blow offers an affecting portrait of a complicated man at last coming into his own -- sometimes gracefully, sometimes under siege, but never without the burden of great expectations.

Baker
& Taylor

Written by an editor who worked for John F. Kennedy, Jr., at George magazine, a moving portrait of a complex man details his last, defining years, revealing the many facets of his personality, as he overcame many obstacles and challenges to run a successful business, managed the pressures of a high public profile, and adjusted to married life. 75,000 first printing.

Publisher: New York : Henry Holt & Co., 2002
Edition: First edition
ISBN: 9780805070514
0805070516
Branch Call Number: 973.922 KENNE BLOW
Characteristics: 294 pages ; 24 cm

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owlycatgirl
Feb 06, 2014

I didn't get the sense that the author was ever actually a friend of John's, nor did he claim to be. As such, the character of John that emerged from this particular biography was rounded out with a few previously unrevealed aspects. Though at times dry and uneventful, worth a read to anyone curious about the life and death of John Kennedy Jr.

joiedevivre Oct 09, 2011

This is a very good book that gives the reader a very unique insight into what it was like working for John.

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