Fried Butter

Fried Butter

A Food Memoir

Book - 2003
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Random House, Inc.
"Clever and witty."—Chicago Tribune

"The writing is offbeat, achieving the trick of seeming at once grounded and untethered. . . . Elemental acuity and the burlesque combine here to delicious effect."—Kirkus Reviews (starred)

"A joyous revelry in good food even when the memories evoked are bittersweet."—USA Today

"Mixes humor and wisdom. . . . Full of piquant philosophical asides and fascinating culinary lore."—San Francisco Chronicle

"Opincar’s bites-of-passage are ruefully funny."—The New York Times Book Review

Foods, flavors, textures, aromas are like memories for Abe Opincar. He remembers leaving his wife the night he baked chicken, being criticized by French hosts for not properly eating ripe peaches with a knife and a fork, eggs sunny side up and first sex, cornmeal mush and his dotty aunt, garlic and his father’s love. We might look at a photograph or memento. Opincar’s recollections are summoned by food.

His life in California, Kyoto, Jerusalem, Paris, Istanbul and Tijuana is all called up by flavors that bring back the moments and places and people he broke bread with and loved. What’s recalled and savored is sometimes laugh-out-loud funny, or insightful and poignant, but it is always witty and penetrating and wholly beguiling. We eat what we are. Food is life, and Opincar relishes it.

Abe Opincar has published countless articles and writes for The San Diego Reader and Gourmet. He lives in Southern California and New York.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

Baker & Taylor
The memoirs of a writer for The San Diego Reader associate people and major events of his life with food, in a personal story that recounts his travels through many parts of the world.

Holtzbrinck
You Eat What You Are Abe Opincar’s memories are joined to food. The rest of us measure our lives in days, hours, minutes, in milestones, achievements, and losses sustained. He remembers leaving his wife the night he baked chicken, being roundly criticized by French hosts for not properly eating ripe peaches with a knife and fork. Also eggs sunny-side up and first sex, cornmeal mush and his dotty aunt, garlic and his father’s love. We refer to clocks, calendars, address books, photographs, and objects we’ve invested with sentiment. Opincar’s references are to beer, saffron, aguardiente, limes, Ibarra chocolate, foie gras, and yams. His life in California, Kyoto, Jerusalem, Paris, Istanbul, and Tijuana is called up by flavors that bring back the moments and places and people he broke bread with and loved. Even the experiences of others are marked by dishes and drinks, fruits and vegetables. What’s recalled and savored is sometimes laugh-out-loud funny, or insightful and poignant, but it is always witty and penetrating and wholly beguiling. We eat what we are. Food is life, and Opincar relishes it.

Publisher: New York : Soho, [2003]
Copyright Date: ©2003
ISBN: 9781569473344
156947334X
Branch Call Number: 641.59 OPINC OPINC
Characteristics: 165 pages ; 21 cm

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