In A Cajun Kitchen

In A Cajun Kitchen

Authentic Cajun Recipes and Stories From A Family Farm on the Bayou

Book - 2006
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Baker & Taylor
An authentic compendium of Cajun recipes by an award-winning culinary writer recalls her family's Louisiana heritage in a treasury of 180 tempting dishes that capture the true flavors of Cajun cuisines--including roasted pork mufaletta sandwiches, creamy crab casserole, gumbo, pecan pie, and more--along with personal reminiscences of Cajun life. 20,000 first printing.

McMillan Palgrave

When most people think of Cajun cooking, they think of blackened redfish or, maybe, gumbo. When Terri Pischoff Wuerthner thinks of Cajun cooking, she thinks about Great-Grandfather Theodore's picnics on Lake Carenton, children gathering crawfish fresh from the bayou for supper, and Grandma Olympe's fricassee of beef, because Terri Pischoff Wuerthner is descended from an old Cajun family. Through a seamless blend of storytelling and recipes to live by, Wuerthner'sIn a Cajun Kitchen will remind people of the true flavors of Cajun cooking.
When her ancestors settled in Louisiana around 1760, her family grew into a memorable clan that understood the pleasures of the table and the bounty of the Louisiana forests, fields, and waters. Wuerthner spices her gumbo with memories of Cajun community dances, wild-duck hunts, and parties at the family farm. From the Civil War to today, Wuerthner brings her California-born Cajun family together to cook and share jambalaya, crawfish étoufée, shrimp boil, and more, while they cook, laugh, eat, and carry on the legacy of Louis Noel Labauve, one of the first French settlers in Acadia in the 1600s.
Along with the memories, In a Cajun Kitchen presents readers with a treasure trove of authentic Cajun recipes: roasted pork mufaletta sandwiches, creamy crab casserole, breakfast cornbread with sausage and apples, gumbo, shrimp fritters, black-eyed pea and andouille bake, coconut pralines, pecan pie, and much more. In a Cajun Kitchen is a great work of culinary history, destined to be an American cookbook classic that home cooks will cherish.



Holtzbrinck
When most people think of Cajun cooking, they think of blackened redfish or, maybe, gumbo. When Terri Pischoff Wuerthner thinks of Cajun cooking, she thinks about Great-Grandfather Theodore’s picnics on Lake Carenton, children gathering crawfish fresh from the bayou for supper, and Grandma Olympe’s fricassee of beef, because Terri Pischoff Wuerthner is descended from an old Cajun family.  Through a seamless blend of storytelling and recipes to live by, Wuerthner’s In a Cajun Kitchen will remind people of the true flavors of Cajun cooking. 
            When her ancestors settled in Louisiana around 1760, her family grew into a memorable clan that understood the pleasures of the table and the bounty of the Louisiana forests, fields, and waters. Wuerthner spices her gumbo with memories of Cajun community dances, wild-duck hunts, and parties at the family farm. From the Civil War to today, Wuerthner brings her California-born Cajun family together to cook and share jambalaya, crawfish étoufée, shrimp boil, and more, while they cook, laugh, eat, and carry on the legacy of Louis Noel Labauve, one of the first French settlers in Acadia in the 1600s.
           Along with the memories, In a Cajun Kitchen presents readers with a treasure trove of authentic Cajun recipes: roasted pork mufaletta sandwiches, creamy crab casserole, breakfast cornbread with sausage and apples, gumbo, shrimp fritters, black-eyed pea and andouille bake, coconut pralines, pecan pie, and much more. In a Cajun Kitchen is a great work of culinary history, destined to be an American cookbook classic that home cooks will cherish.


Publisher: New York : St. Martin's Press, 2006
Edition: First edition
ISBN: 9780312343057
0312343051
Branch Call Number: 641.5976 WUERT
Characteristics: xxiii, 280 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations (some color), portraits ; 25 cm

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JoCoAcadian
Aug 26, 2011

More creole rather than cajun, but still good. Liked it well enough that I bought the book.

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