My Father's Bonus March

My Father's Bonus March

Book - 2009
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Random House, Inc.
To his friends, Seymour Langer was one of the brightest kids to emerge from Chicago’s Depression-era Jewish West Side. To his family, he was a driven and dedicated physician, a devoted father and husband. But to his Adam, youngest son, Seymour was also an enigma: a somewhat distant figure to whom Adam could never quite measure up, a worldly man who never left the city of Chicago during the last third of his life, a would-be author who spoke for years of writing a history of the Bonus March of 1932, when twenty thousand World War I veterans descended on the nation’s capital to demand compensation.

Using this dramatic but overlooked event in U.S. history as a means of understanding his relationship with his father, Adam Langer sets out to uncover why the Bonus March intrigued Seymour Langer, whose personal history seemed to be artfully obscured by a mix of evasiveness and exaggeration. The author interweaves the story of the Bonus March and interviews with such individuals as history aficionado Senator John Kerry and the writer and critic Norman Podhoretz with his own reminiscences and those of his father’s relatives, colleagues, and contemporaries. In the process, he explores the nature of memory while creating a moving, multilayered portrait of both his father and his father’s generation.

Baker & Taylor
The author of such works as Ellington Boulevard traces his research into post-depression Chicago to better understand his physician father, an effort marked by a contrast between his father's admired status and the author's conflicted memories.

Blackwell North Amer
To his friends, Seymour Langer was one of the brightest kids to emerge from Chicago's Depression-era Jewish West Side. To his family, he was a driven and dedicated physician, a devoted father and husband. But to Adam, his youngest son, Seymour was also an enigma: a somewhat distant figure to whom Adam could never quite measure up, a worldly man who never left the city of Chicago during the last third of his life, a would-be author who spoke for years of writing a history of the Bonus March of 1932, when twenty thousand World War I veterans descended on the nation's capital to demand compensation.
Using this dramatic but overlooked event in U.S. history as a means of understanding his relationship with his father, Adam Langer sets out to uncover why the Bonus March intrigued Seymour Langer, whose personal history seemed to be artfully obscured by a mix of evasiveness and exaggeration. The author interweaves the story of the Bonus March and interviews with such individuals as history aficionado Senator John Kerry and the writer and critic Norman Podhoretz with his own reminiscences and those of his father's relatives, colleagues, and contemporaries. In the process, he explores the nature of memory while creating a moving, multilayered portrait of both his father and his father's generation.

Baker
& Taylor

Traces the author's research into post-depression Chicago to better understand his physician father, an effort marked by a contrast between his father's admired status and the author's conflicted memories.

Publisher: New York : Spiegel & Grau, [2009]
Edition: First edition
Copyright Date: ©2009
ISBN: 9780385523721
Branch Call Number: 306.8742 LANGE LANGE

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