Driving With Plato

Driving With Plato

The Meaning of Life's Milestones

Book - 2011
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Baker & Taylor
Outlines steps for getting the most out of life's major events, drawing on the teachings of philosophy, literature, politics, and other disciplines to explain how to achieve more enriching milestones.

Blackwell Publishing
Learn to ride a bicycle with Einstein, have your first kiss with Kant, get your first job with Adam Smith, and weather midlife with Dante. Let history's greatest minds illuminate life's turning points.

In Breakfast with Socrates, Robert Rowland Smith brought the power of philosophy down to earth by proving, in a very engaging and entertaining way, that human moments meet big ideas on a regular basis. Now Smith offers the natural offspring of that book, expanding the "day in a life" concept to life as a whole in Driving with Plato.

Start with being born. For some, like Sartre, you get off to a bad start: You didn't ask to be born, and there's little point to it anyway, as life is meaningless. And yet for Martin Heidegger, if you hadn't been born, you'd have no sense of your own being, and that would be a tragic loss. How about midlife crisis? When Dante wrote The Divine Comedy, he deliberately set his story of spiritual transformation at the halfway point of his life. Nietzsche, too, in his autobiography, spoke of burying his forty-fifth year as he went on to yet higher forms of actualization as a self-styled superman. Drawing on the great philosophers, as well as on literature, art, politics, and psychology, Smith creates the richest possible range of ideas for readers to contemplate, all in a warm, humorous voice that revels both in life's absurdities and in the pure delight of discovery.

Grounding abstract ideas in concrete experience, Driving with Plato helps us think more deeply about the key events in our lives even as it provides a philosophical education that everyone can appreciate and enjoy.

Baker
& Taylor

Smith shares a delightful, intellectual romp through life's milestones--being born, learning to drive, and getting married--all enlivened with apropos philosophy.
The author of Breakfast with Socrates outlines steps for getting the most out of life's major events, building on his "day in a life" concept and drawing on the teachings of philosophy, literature, politics and other disciplines to explain how to achieve more enriching milestones. 40,000 first printing.

Simon and Schuster
Learn to ride a bicycle with Einstein, have your first kiss with Kant, get your first job with Adam Smith, and weather midlife with Dante. Let history’s greatest minds illuminate life’s turning points.

In Breakfast with Socrates, Robert Rowland Smith brought the power of philosophy down to earth by proving, in a very engaging and entertaining way, that human moments meet big ideas on a regular basis. Now Smith offers the natural offspring of that book, expanding the “day in a life” concept to life as a whole in Driving with Plato.

Start with being born. For some, like Sartre, you get off to a bad start: You didn’t ask to be born, and there’s little point to it anyway, as life is meaningless. And yet for Martin Heidegger, if you hadn’t been born, you’d have no sense of your own being, and that would be a tragic loss. How about midlife crisis? When Dante wrote The Divine Comedy, he deliberately set his story of spiritual transformation at the halfway point of his life. Nietzsche, too, in his autobiography, spoke of burying his forty-fifth year as he went on to yet higher forms of actualization as a self-styled superman. Drawing on the great philosophers, as well as on literature, art, politics, and psychology, Smith creates the richest possible range of ideas for readers to contemplate, all in a warm, humorous voice that revels both in life’s absurdities and in the pure delight of discovery.

Grounding abstract ideas in concrete experience, Driving with Plato helps us think more deeply about the key events in our lives even as it provides a philosophical education that everyone can appreciate and enjoy.

Publisher: New York : Free Press, 2011
Edition: First Free Press hardcover edition
ISBN: 9781439186879
Branch Call Number: 128 SMITH
Characteristics: 234 pages

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Pilatus
Oct 02, 2011

An intelligent and humorous philosophical perspective of life's benchmarks. Would love to meet the author. Shed a whole new light on philosophers I have never wanted to read but now do.

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